Solutions To Growing Tomato Problems

I know you can’t help it. You can never deny that homegrown tomatoes are certainly a top grosser. You love it and you want more of it. But the fresh tomatoes you have in your homes are not products of one day labor. To have a piece of the best, you need to work for it and you need to be very cautious of some problems that may be observed as your tomatoes grow. These problems may be caused by natural conditions while most are caused by diseases, viruses and pests. But hey, you don’t have to worry so much. These troubles are very easy to handle especially if you could handle them earlier.

Here are the signs that you should look for in able to avoid tomato growing problems. You need to observe if green patches are evident on your fruit. These green patches signals that your tomato plant is exposed too much to the sun. This will later lead to fruits that will turn yellow instead of red. Blossom end rot is another problem that you might encounter as you grow your tomatoes. This is the condition wherein the fruit rots down. This disease occurs because of the lack of calcium or if there is an irregular water intake on your plant. Early signs of blossom end rot are the black spots that are formed on the bottom of your tomato’s blossom (just like how it is named).

The most common symptom for tomato plant infection is actually checked through the observation of the leaves of the plant. If the leaves that are found at the lowest part of the stem bows down and when there are brown stripes formed at the midribs, that means the plant may soon suffer from Bacterial Canker. If there are black spots on leaves specially the old ones, this is a symptom of Early Blight. This later on will continue until it includes the stems and even the fruits.

Other symptoms you need to observe to detect early tomato problems are darkening or yellowing of the leaves, the sudden falling off of your tomato plant’s leaves, discoloration and black spot formations on your stem and fruits, wilting of the leaves and the discoloration of the stems. Detection of tomato growing problems can be done with a very keen eye. And problems can occur anytime. It can attack the stems, the roots, the leaves and worst the fruits. “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure” but if you really can’t prevent it especially if the major factors are beyond your control, then you just have to work things out.

With your every bite of the succulent tomatoes you have labored in your homes, you’ll definitely feel one of the freshest experiences. And for that you can’t help but ask for more. You’ll realize how these sweet fruit creates a blast as you take a bite one after the other. And you’ll tell yourself that despite the work you poured in growing your plants, it was indeed worth it.

Paul Dale is the author of “Tomato Growing Secrets”. For more great information on avoiding tomato growing problems go to our website. The website contains valuable information on anything related to growing your own tomatoes.

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Island Grow Pots- 10 Gallon Grow Bag Container- Perfect for Growing Tomatoes

Island Grow Pots 10 Gallon Potting Bag. Reliable, Convenient, Portable way to grow your plants; the Mother of Island Grow Pots!

Product Features
– Oxygenate your plant’s root system
– With the unique breathable fabric, your plant will naturally air prune its root structure
– No more trapped water! With easy drainage your plant will no longer experience over watering
– Sturdy handles allow for easy transportation and rearranging of your garden
– Kiss your root bound plant goodbye

Island Grow Pots offer a great alternative to traditional plastic potting
Provide your plant with an oxygenated environment to allow and encourage root growth and development
The durable cloth potting material allows for sufficient airflow exchange between the plant’s roots and soil

Looking to conserve on water?!
– With Island Grow Pots your plant experiences better water disbursement
– Water is allowed to flow freely throughout the soil and root system carrying oxygen to all areas of the roots

No More Root Bound Plants!!!
Traditional platic pots cause large singular roots, aka damaging root bound plants. Island Grow Pots assist the plant in developing multiple smaller root clusters allowing for a healthier, happier plant
Now that the root system is no longer restricted to a plastic pot it can grow freely providing itself with the necessary space it desires to effectively grow to its full capacity

Our pot is your number one option, welcome to your plant’s oasis!

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Ferry-Morse 3140 Organic Tomato Seeds, Beefsteak (600 Milligram Packet)

From the Manufacturer

Organic. Extremely large-fruited beefsteak tomato with excellent vigor. High in vitamins A and C. Indeterminate. An excellent slicing tomato that is popular with home gardeners. Seed can be sown directly into garden when soil is warm. Tomatoes cannot tolerate frost. To keep fruit clean and easier to pick, support with stakes or cages. Tomatoes require at least an inch of water per week. Start seeds indoors in a sunny location 6 weeks prior to warm weather. Transplant outdoors in full sun when seedlings display 4-6 leaves and weather is warm.

Product Description
Ferry-Morse has been supplying the best in seed and gardening supplies for over 100 years, and we are proud to still be innovating and improving. Whether you are looking for the finest in flowers or gourmet garden vegetables, you will find all your answers here. Take a minute and explore our product categories for planning and inspiration. At Ferry-Morse, we want you to enjoy your best ever gardening experience. Ferry-Morse Seed Company offers gardener’s over 350 varieties of flower, vegetable, and herb seed.

Buy 500 Beef Steak Tomatoe Vegetable Seeds

* We are up to 10 varieties of tomato seeds available for your eating pleasure with more on the way soon! Don’t miss any colors or sizes! Collect them all! Ha ha. * ** FREE SHIPPING ON ANY ADDITIONAL SEEDS! PAY ONLY ONE FLAT SHIPPING FEE OF $2.50 FOR US ORDERS NO MATTER HOW MANY YOU ORDER! PLEASE VISIT MY STORE FOR OVER 800 TYPES OF FLOWER, HERB, FRUIT & VEGETABLE SEEDS!!! ** FLAT RATE SHIPPING TO CANADA AND WORLDWIDE IS JUST $3.50. Sorry, no shipments to Italy at this time.

All seeds will come in a resealable plastic zip lock bag with a label featuring a picture of the flower, planting instructions, and plant specifications such as height, spacing, and light requirements for easy planting. If stored properly, seeds can last for years! All seed packets contain 100 percent true named seeds – there are no fillers or other weeds or seeds mixed in. Most have been harvested by hand and all test at an exceptionally high germination rate.

Combined free shipping applies to an unlimited number of seed packets paid for together at checkout within the required payment time of 7 days after last purchase has been made. International buyers please check with your local customs office regarding regulations and allowances on plant seeds. I cannot be responsible for anything seized by customs or irratiated by your local post office. Please understand there are too many countries and too many types of seeds for me to be able to research every possibility. All international shipments will be sent First Class Mail International.

You will be provided with a tracking number but please remember that international shipments take longer to arrive. If you have any questions about shipping, ordering, or the plants themselves, please feel free to send me a message. While I do not claim to know everything, I will be more than glad to answer any questions I can either from my own extensive experience or will do my best to try to find an answer for you.

Mulch The Secret To Growing The Best Tomatoes

I often advocate the use of mulches for your tomato garden. A good mulch used correctly can be of great benefit. However there are both good and bad mulches and right and wrong ways to apply them. Knowing the differences are vital and getting mulching right will have a dramatic effect on your tomato garden.

The Benefits of Mulching

  • can protect your soil from erosion by heavy rains

  • wards against soil compaction

  • discourages weed growth

  • insulates the soil evening out temperature effects

  • helps regulate water loss, evening out watering requirements somewhat

  • improves soil composition (if organic)

  • helps isolate the soil from the leaves and reduce the likelihood of soil borne diseases spreading

Choosing a Good Mulch

There are various materials that you can make mulch with. The key really is to match the crop to the mulch. Some of the more usual and unusual mulches (with comments listed) are…

  • Compost – has the benefit of adding organic matter to the ground but looks unsightly and if it contains moulds and spores can be more detrimental than beneficial. Not strictly a mulch.

  • Lawn Clippings – can contain grass seeds if it is from a late spring growing and as you want a garden not a second lawn this is not a desirable thing. Also if the lawn has been treated with Herbicide or Weed Killer it will not be a pretty thing. If you want to use grass clippings then let them dry out completely first.

  • Leaves – be wary about using leaves that have not been aged for a considerable period (at least nine months) as the phenols which inhibit growth may still be present.

  • Sawdust – again it is best if it is allowed to decompose for a year before use and you will require additional Nitrogen if using it.

  • Straw – messy and can be hard to apply but is an excellent mulch. Not free you have to buy it. Definitely do not use hay though as it is full of weed seeds.

  • Wood Chips – same as sawdust essentially with the added issue that they should not be dug into the soil, which can be an issue.

  • Newspaper – quite commonly used. Will fly away very easily so usually needs to be watered in and requires a heavier mulch over the top which seems to be self defeating to me.

  • Black Plastic – environmentally unfriendly. Best to put in down before transplanting and then cut holes to lay plants in however if this seems attractive then you should consider…

  • Landscape Fabric – easier to work with than plastic and lets natural water through. Better still though is…

  • Bio-degradable Weed Mats – all the benefits of plastic and fabric and completely eco-friendly.

  • Pea Straw – Adds good organic matter. Decomposes quickly and can be sown in at the end of the season.

  • Barley Straw – Softer than Pea and other straws and absorbs water more readily.

How to Apply Mulch

Mulch is not difficult to apply generally speaking as it is essentially just surrounding the plants with the materials used. However there are some points that definitely need to be followed…

  • The first and most important point is don’t mulch until the plant has established itself. Mulching fresh seedlings is not good. Remember that one of the effects of mulching is to retard new growth, which is how it helps to control weeds. Obviously this is counter productive for fresh seedlings.

  • Weed your garden prior to applying any mulch. For the same reasons as the first point we want to make it hard for weeds to establish themselves.
  • Put a good amount of mulch around each individual plant a two or three inch layer is good.
  • DO NOT place the mulch closer to the plant stem than three inches. Mulch right up against the stem can encourage rot.

Best Mulch for Tomatoes

Barley or Pea Straw would be a top choice or Bio-degradable mats. Landscape fabric is good to lay from scratch if you are setting up your garden and can be easier to manage. Unfortunately none of these are free so your budget will be a consideration in your choice.

Summary

The subject of mulching should be a simple one. If you understand the reasons that you are using mulch and the requirements of your particular vegetable then simply pick one that you like which will fit the bill and go for it.

One last thing… remember that this article is written with tomatoes in mind and the information will not apply to all vegetables. Good growing…

Want to learn more about watering tomato plants [http://www.growingbettertomatoes.com/watering-tomato-plants]? Visit my website at [http://www.growingbettertomatoes.com] helpful tips and information on planting and caring for a thriving tomato garden.

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Grow Tomato Plants Upside Down – Better Tomatoes

How do you grow tomatoes upside down and why even bother to do it?

Actually, it’s pretty smart, and many tomato growers swear by the fact that their tomatoes are bigger and more plentiful as a result. This article will discuss how and why to grow upside down tomatoes.

When tomatoes are growing upside down, the shoots and stems are not fighting gravity. Gravity is actually helping the plants to grow so the stems grow stronger and healthier as a result. There is improved air circulation around the plant which also encourages growth.

Another benefit to growing your tomatoes upside down is that you never have to stake them or support them as they develop. Normally with the tomato plants growing rightside up, the plants must be staked or supported to help them bear the weight of the developing tomatoes and keep them from settling to the ground.

When tomatoes are allowed to settle to the ground they fall prey to pests, diseases and rot. It’s a bad thing which must be avoided – and hanging the plants upside down avoids it more effectively than any other technique.

How Is It Done?

It’s really quite simple. You will be growing your tomato plants out of a bucket. Most growers prefer five gallon paint buckets that can be picked up inexpensively at your local hardware store.

Cut a hole in the bottom of the bucket at least 2 – 2 1/2 inches wide. Set the bucket on the ground. Find some old newspaper or better yet a coffee filter and put it on the bottom of the bucket, over the hole. Fill the bucket with soil and place the cover over the bucket.

Now turn the bucket over so that the hole in the bottom is now on top. Remove the coffee filter and reach in with your hand and grab enough of the soil out of the bucket to make room for the planting of a tomato seedling

Gently plant the seedling in the hole and replace the soil around it, packing it in firmly. Now place more old newspaper or a couple of coffee filters around the young plant to secure it in and prevent soil from dropping out when it is suspended upside down.

Now gently pick up the bucket and set it rightside up so that the plant is suspended upside down. Remove the cover from the top of the bucket and suspend the bucket – plant arrangement on a firm hook, a firm trellis, a plant support or some other similar plant-holding structure.

Water the plant by simply watering the soil at the top of the bucket until you start to see a few drops coming through the 2 inch hole on the bottom.

You’re done! You can now look forward to your upside down tomato plant producing healthy, large, sweet delicious tomatoes all spring and summer.

Samuel Kerr is a tomato growing expert. For more information on growing tomatoes [http://www.tomatogrowingsecretinfo.com/grow-upside-down-tomatoes/], visit [http://www.tomatogrowingsecretinfo.com]

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Growing The Best Tomatoes

If you are trying to produce the tastiest and best growing tomatoes possible, you may have wondered what the difference is between a determinate and indeterminate tomato. Not only does each have distinctive qualities, but, many gardeners agree that there is a definite taste difference between the two.

It is helpful to know how determinant and indeterminate tomatoes differ. The distinctions below can assist in helping you produce the best growing tomatoes you can and enjoy the bounty each plant brings.

Characteristics of the indeterminate tomato plants:

1) have the ability to grow 6 – 10 feet tall

2) are generally sturdier and produce more tomatoes than the determinants

3) fruit is set on nearly every node and continues producing until frost

4) needs room to spread out and will require firm stakes

Characteristics of the determinant tomato plants:

1) also known as “bush tomatoes,” these grow up to 6 feet tall before extending to the side instead of upward

2) tomatoes mature faster – average of 60 days

3) tomatoes generally ripen all at once, and are therefore good for canning, freezing, or drying

4) pruning or staking is not needed

5) fruit is set on only a single node

Because they are less costly and easier to grow on a commercial scale, at least 80% of store bought tomatoes are from determinate plants. It is believed that determinants have less flavor due to all the fruit developing at once, and therefore less sugar and nutrients are available for each fruit.

Some examples of indeterminate tomatoes are:

1) heirloom

2) Big Beef (most of the beefsteak types)

3) Supersonic

4) Early Girl

5) Big Boy

Some examples of determinant tomatoes are:

1) Pik-Red

2) Peacevine

3) Super Bush

4) Celebrity

5) Roma

6) Sprite

Because each variety has its’ own pros and cons, you have to look at you own unique situation to decide which tomato plant is the best for your circumstances. If you have limited space, the determinant may be a better option as these varieties can easily be grown on a patio.

Deb R. is an avid gardener with a special interest in growing tomato plants. Are you trying to grow the best juicy and tasty tomato possible, and avoid disease, pests, and soil problems? Best Growing Tomatoes [http://www.bestgrowingtomatoes.info]. Check out this fantastic guide on how to grow fabulous tomatoes right now! [http://www.bestgrowingtomatoes.info]

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Best Time To Grow Tomatoes

Everything has a perfect timing… even in planting tomatoes. If you wish to have the best out of what you’re doing, you simply have to wait for the best or the right time in your planting especially if you choose to plant tomatoes through seeds. It could be more demanding compared to growing with the help of seedlings but it is still manageable and not very difficult to do.

Growing tomatoes from seeds begins indoors for about six to eight weeks (6-8). They can actually be directly planted outdoors but will result to minimal yield. Winter is actually the best time to plant your seeds. The season will keep your seeds moist at all times. The warmth of your soil should also be at least 15C or about 60F. You begin with a seed starting mix with peat moss. This mixture can actually be bought at the garden stores for a very convenient price. If you are planting in different varieties, it is best that you separate each type using different cans or containers.

In a mixing pan, you simply have to put the mixture and add water to keep it moist. Scatter your seeds and distribute it evenly in the mixture after which you have to cover again. You have to keep your seed moist – covering and checking it after two to three (2-3) days. As it starts to sprout, (which is ten days), that’s when you have to give your seeds an artificial lighting which is twelve to sixteen (12-16) hours.

As a second seed appears, this means you need to start transplanting your seedlings in individual containers or pots. As a tip, the plastic pots are actually better in keeping the soil moist. When you have transplanted your seedlings in individual pots, this means it is ready for hardening. This is simply preparing your plant to its exposure to sunlight. When six leaves already appear, that means your seed which has now grown into a seedling is ready for transplant into the ground, right into your garden.

Ever heard of the principle of the seed? You need to plant a lot of seeds because many of it will not grow. That works with your tomato seeds as well. Literally, many will not grow into seedlings so you need to plant as many as you can.

Actually, there is really no exact timing or perfect time for you to plant your seeds. The key factor to your success is simply giving what your plant requires for it to grow well. Keeping it moist at all times and giving your seeds warmth while you germinate is no less than the best that you could do.

Paul Dale is the author of “Tomato Growing Secrets”. For more great information on growing tomatoes from seeds go to our website. The website contains valuable information on anything related to growing your own tomatoes.

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Save Time Growing Tomatoes Upside Down

One popular way gardeners maximize on limited space is by growing vegetable plants upside down in hanging containers. Thanks to the mad scientist experimental types, we now know that tomatoes can indeed be grown downwards (or upside down) from hanging containers quite easily.

This is excellent news to those of us who love to garden don’t have enough space to do so. Now we apartment gardeners can grow delicious tomatoes at home just like anybody else!

Added Ease and Comfort.Even tomato lovers with outdoor space have turned to this innovative method for growing tomato plants for both the added ease and comfort that it offers.

Just consider – growing tomatoes upside down eliminates the need for staking and trellising. The support that tomato plants normally need as they grow taller is no longer necessary. When growing upside down, the weight of the plant just falls naturally downwards towards the ground. Growing tomatoes in containers also means no more weeding!

Rather then trekking back and forth to the garden, kneeling in the dirt and hacking away at your plant to get a few tomatoes for your salad, just walk over to your hanging container and pick the juicy tomato of your choice!

Maximize Sunlight. Gardeners who lack an area that receives the required 6 – 8 hours of sunlight needed by tomato plants to fruit, will also benefit from using an upside down tomato planter.

Their hanging tomato plants can easily be moved from sunny spot to sunny spot throughout the day to get as much sunlight as possible.

Save Time.Those without the time it takes to tend to a proper garden on a daily basis will benefit from the less time intensive practice of growing tomatoes upside down in pots. With the tomato plant neatly contained in a hanging pot, it require much less time to take care of it.

Those with poor garden soil can also stop worrying about the laborious process of conditioning and preparing the soil to grow vibrant tomatoes. Simply use a packet of high quality potting soil in your hanging tomato pot and forget about it.

Less Pests. And perhaps the greatest benefit to growing tomatoes upside down in a container is that you will have less pests to deal with. Most tomato eating bugs will find it more difficult to get to a hanging tomato plant than when it is on the ground Additionally, tomato plants grown in containers are further apart from each other, reducing the spread of disease from plant to plant.

Healthier Crops.Growing tomatoes upside down is actually also beneficial for the plant itself, helping it to produce larger and healthier tomatoes, thanks to the fact that air flows more easily around the plant and branches have less stress on them as they grow.

Tomatoes grown upside down tend to ripen sooner than tomatoes grown in a traditional garden. Plus, because the tomatoes never actually touch the ground, you will avoid the frustrations that most tomato gardeners face when their tomatoes rot due to too much contact with the soil.

Best Varieties for Upside Down Tomato Growers. Most any tomato variety can be successfully grown upside down, but you will find that the smaller varieties are better suited for it. Cherry tomatoes and “grape” tomatoes make an excellent choice for upside down growing.

Conclusion.If you live in a small apartment or have limited outdoor space – don’t despair! You can have your tomato plant…and eat it too! Growing an upside down tomato garden can be just – if not more – rewarding than a traditional one.

To learn more about Indoor Vegetable Gardening, Growing Tomatoes Upside Down and Small Space Gardening, sign up for the FREE Mini Course “Indoor Gardening Success” at http://www.ContainerGardeningCenter.com.

Becky Sheldon is a container and indoor gardening expert and enthusiast who wants everybody to be able to grow their own delicious food, no matter where they live!

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Growing Tomatoes The Right Way

Green thumb or no green thumb, a practical way to beat inflation is to learn how to grow tomatoes, garlic, squash and other crops right in your backyard. By learning to plant tomatoes and other vegetables, you and your family won’t run the risk of getting hungry again – no matter what economic status your country will succumb to.

One thing to remember and one thing you need to remind yourself time and time again is that to grow tomatoes successfully, it doesn’t happen overnight. Tomatoes also don’t fall from the sky when you wish for them. It takes patience, time and more knowledge about the do’s and don’t of planting tomatoes.

First things first, don’t crowd the seedlings. This is especially important of you want to grow tomatoes from seed. They need room to branch out. If they’re placed closer together, it can inhibit their growth. This means, you need to transplant them when you see their first true leaves coming out. You need to move them in 4-inch pots about 2 weeks afterwards.

Next, tomatoes need lots of light. If you can’t provide them with direct sunlight, you can just give them around 14 to 18 hours of grow light. Just place the young plants a few inches from your fluorescent grow lights. Then, plant the tomatoes outside right in your vegetable plot’s sunniest portion.

Then, Put fans over your seedlings. In order to develop strong stems, these tomato plants require movement and swaying. You can provide a breeze just by turning on the fan for about 5 to 10 minutes 2x a day.

Next, Preheat your garden soil. This is very important since tomatoes love the heat. Make sure you cover the planting areas using red or black plastic. This should be done a few weeks before planting. The extra warmth can give way to earlier tomatoes.

Afterwards, bury the tomato plants deeper than their position in the pot. It is best to bury them until only the top leaves are visible. This is since tomatoes are capable of developing roots from their stems. You can dig a deep hole or even a shallow tunnel just so you can dig the plant sideways. Eventually, it will straighten out and grow towards the sun. Just be careful you don’t drive your cage or pole in the stem.

Mulching is the next important step, especially after the ground has warmed up. This is good for water retention and for preventing soil born diseases. Plastic mulch is highly advisable for tomatoes.

To grow tomatoes, you also need to take out the bottom leaves, particularly when they reach 3 inches tall. You can also spray compost tea to ward off fungus diseases.

Start pinching and pruning. This is a good way to take out the suckers developing in the crotch joints of any two tomato branches. Aside from being unable to bear fruit, they can take away the energy from the plant. Just thin the leaves to let the sun reach into the ripening of the fruit. The leaves are still necessary in creating sugars for tomato flavor.

Regularly water the tomato plants. Unable to do so will result to blossom end rotting and cracking. Also lessen the water when the fruit starts to ripen.

Get the plant to set tomatoes. Depending on the type of tomato, set them to ripen fruit at the same time. You can do this by pinching the tips of the main stems during early summer season.

Visit GrowGuides.Net and HowToPlant.Net for ideal methods on how to grow tomatoes and for useful tips on how to plant tomatoes.

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